They lost faith in Trump

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Frédéric Arnould (access the author's page)

"God has installed our Commander-in-Chief in the White House, thank the Lord", launches with his tone of preacher beloved of his church, Ruddy Gracia, founding bishop of Segadores de Vida in the suburbs of Miami.

In his half-full place of worship, he speaks to the faithful, the vast majority of whom are Spanish-speaking. Today the church was stormed by President Trump's reelection machine and who better to add some prestige to this event than a distinguished guest, Eric Trump, one of the sons Of the president.

Behind the scenes, Trump hears Gracia praising his father. I saw a man with a divine mission who proved to me in just a few hours that he was sent from God.

Dear Bishop, you can believe that someone was guiding us up there, because we wouldn't have had a chance to win in 2016.

Eric trump

The president's son takes the opportunity to warn against the Democrats who, according to him, would inflict the worst evils on Christendom. I do not understand why we want to rid society of faith, to want to close churches and destroy the family nucleushe explains in front of the crowd who disapprove of such things, even if they are not verified.

Eric Trump on a stage.

Eric Trump is on a mission in this church praising his father, Donald.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Frédéric Arnould

Regardless, the good comments come out on the president. He is a man of faith that he is by the way he takes care of the world and our country, said this one. I will pray for him. You can recognize a tree by its fruit, look at it, it's simple, adds another.

Dissent among Evangelicals

But not all evangelicals think the same. In a suburb of Orlando, Pastor Joel Hunter has just co-signed a letter alongside 1,600 religious leaders urging Christians to vote for Joe Biden.

In the letter, evangelical leaders are prepared to put aside their essential goal: to prevent abortion at all costs. Hunter, who voted for Trump four years ago, regrets it very much. <q data-attributes = '{"lang": {"value": "fr", "label": "Français"}, "value": {"html": "I said to myself: "Let's give it a chance, after all what could happen badly," he laughs out loud. I'm changing my vote this time. I haven't changed my mind about abortion, but there are other issues like access to health care, poverty, climate change, which are all pro-life issues. "," text ":" I thought, 'let's give it a chance, after all what bad things can happen, ' he laughs out loud. I'm changing my vote this time. I haven't changed my mind about abortion, but there are other issues like access to health care, poverty, climate change, which are all pro-life issues. "}} 'lang = "en”>I was like, 'let's give it a chance, after all what bad things can happen,' he laughs out loud. I'm changing my vote this time. I haven't changed my mind on abortion, but there are other issues like access to health care, poverty, climate change, which are all pro-life issues.

He adds that his position cost him support within his congregation, but it was worth asserting himself.

Trump, this unrepentant sinner

In neighboring Florida, Evangelical Pastor Doug Pagitt encourages voters to vote at a polling station in Atlanta, Georgia.

On his love bus, as he calls it, he has already traveled more than 145,000 kilometers from east to west in the country trying to change Christians' minds about their vote. He tells us he doesn't like the president. I don't believe he's a man of faith. He is what is called an unrepentant sinner. He's the one who's going to drown and who clings to you to take you deep with him.

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Doug Pagitt takes a self-portrait in front of his bus.

Presidential campaign: Meeting with evangelicals

Photo: Radio-Canada / Frédéric Arnould

His actions speak louder than his words, according to Pagitt, who was shocked by Donald Trump last summer when he ordered the use of cayenne pepper to chase citizens from Lafayette Park in front of the White House so that 'he can brandish, triumphantly, the Bible. He is not someone who takes faith seriously.

A less useful president

For the past four years, evangelicals have seen Donald Trump as a bulwark against abortion, even though he hasn't actually done much on this issue.

The only bright spot, according to Pastor Joel Hunter, is that he has appointed Tory Supreme Court justices, which bodes well for ensuring abortion does not gain or even lose ground. Now that it's done, there is less motivation to vote for him again, he believes.

Pray for America, can we read on a poster.

Religion is an important player in election campaigns in the United States.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Frédéric Arnould

Doug Pagitt, who has polled white Catholics and Evangelicals in pivotal states where the differences in voting intentions between Biden and Trump are rather small, sees an opportunity to tip the scales in favor of Joe Biden. <q data-attributes = '{"lang": {"value": "fr", "label": "Français"}, "value": {"html": "A large number of evangelicals and perhaps 50% of Catholics will still vote for Trump and that is a problem in itself, but he has lost enough support among them that he is not re-elected. "," text ":" A lot of evangelicals and can – being 50% of Catholics will still vote for Trump and that is a problem in itself, but he has lost enough support among them that he is not reelected. "}} 'lang =" en”>A lot of evangelicals and maybe 50% of Catholics will still vote for Trump and that is a problem in itself, but he has lost enough support among them that he is not reelected.

He calculated that it is enough that between 5% and 7% of Christians do not vote for Trump, and voila. There are two weeks left for his wish to be granted.


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